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Ospreys at Kielder

Ospreys at Kielder

Click here for the latest information on Coronavirus

https://www.visitkielder.com/news/2020/03/update-for-coronavirus-covid-19-

2020 is the 12th successive year of ospreys breeding in Kielder Forest. In 2019, six pairs of ospreys laid eggs using nest platforms erected by Forestry England. The fantastic start to the season didn't continue, with several chicks dying during the season. However, nine healthy young ospreys migrated south.

The restrictions necessary as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic have impacted on the ability to monitor the osprey nests in as much detail as normal. However, we know that a new platform has been taken so there are ospreys on seven nests in the forest for the first time. One nest is unlikely to be productive, but there is breeding underway at the other six sites. Of particular note is the fact that 2014 Nest 1 male Blue UV has paired with a Scottish female and they are incubating. This is another first, as UV is the only osprey hatched in Kielder Forest to attempt to breed here. There’s been other excitement, with two offspring from 2018 being seen on the nest cams. A flying start to the season!

The history of ospreys at Kielder is summarised on the timeline, 2020's key events can be found here

Every year, once the ospreys return to Kielder, Northumberland Wildlife Trust coordinates a team of knowledgeable volunteers who share their expertise with visitors from the viewing point situated behind the Boat Inn at Kielder Waterside. And Calvert Kielder run seasonal Osprey and Wildlife Cruises, providing a great way to have a chance to see the birds up close. These will resume once we receive further advice following Government Guidelines  See http://www.visitkielder.com/wildlife-events  

Due to Coronavirus the 2020 Osprey Watch season has been postponed. Northumberland Wildlife Trust is continuing to review the situation and updates will be posted on social media.

You can support Osprey Watch by donating via the link below. 

http://kielderospreys.wordpress.com/donate/

Between late March and early September Ospreys often hunt over the water. The birds use all parts of the reservoir, but some favourite areas are either side of the water at the dam, the area between Bull Crag and Leaplish Bay, and Leaplish Bay itself. The ospreys regularly hunt soon after first light and again in the early evening, around 17.30-18.00, but can be active at any time of the day. As the breeding season goes on, more fish will be required by ever-hungry growing chicks.

You can follow the progress of the Kielder ospreys by visiting the blog at, http://kielderospreys.wordpress.com.

 

Photo: Simon Mackie. Blagdon Lake. Somerset 31.3.13


What you said:

“Great to see the male and female together.” – Murray family, County Durham

“Fantastic to see such a rare sight!” – Lindsay Kemp, Isle of Wight

"Wonderful! Really excellent information.” – Margaret Clate, Newcastle

“Very knowledgeable guide. Great to see the ospreys. Thanks!!” – Dawn Livesey, Lancashire

Kielder Osprey Watch is possible thanks to the hard work of Kielder Water & Forest Park Development Trust, Forestry Commission, RSPB, Northumberland Wildlife Trust, Northumbrian Water and other partners. We would like to thank Bellingham Fund and Northumberland National Park Area Action Fund for their support this year which has funded volunteer support and leaflets to improve the visitor experience.

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Outside Tower Knowe Visitor Centre
Counter
The Kielder Wave Chamber
5502 at Kielder Water

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, many of the facilities in Kielder Water & Forest Park are closed.

Please click here for the latest information on what is open in the Park.

Ospreys at Kielder

Ospreys at Kielder

Click here for the latest information on Coronavirus

https://www.visitkielder.com/news/2020/03/update-for-coronavirus-covid-19-

2020 is the 12th successive year of ospreys breeding in Kielder Forest. In 2019, six pairs of ospreys laid eggs using nest platforms erected by Forestry England. The fantastic start to the season didn't continue, with several chicks dying during the season. However, nine healthy young ospreys migrated south.

The restrictions necessary as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic have impacted on the ability to monitor the osprey nests in as much detail as normal. However, we know that a new platform has been taken so there are ospreys on seven nests in the forest for the first time. One nest is unlikely to be productive, but there is breeding underway at the other six sites. Of particular note is the fact that 2014 Nest 1 male Blue UV has paired with a Scottish female and they are incubating. This is another first, as UV is the only osprey hatched in Kielder Forest to attempt to breed here. There’s been other excitement, with two offspring from 2018 being seen on the nest cams. A flying start to the season!

The history of ospreys at Kielder is summarised on the timeline, 2020's key events can be found here

Every year, once the ospreys return to Kielder, Northumberland Wildlife Trust coordinates a team of knowledgeable volunteers who share their expertise with visitors from the viewing point situated behind the Boat Inn at Kielder Waterside. And Calvert Kielder run seasonal Osprey and Wildlife Cruises, providing a great way to have a chance to see the birds up close. These will resume once we receive further advice following Government Guidelines  See http://www.visitkielder.com/wildlife-events  

Due to Coronavirus the 2020 Osprey Watch season has been postponed. Northumberland Wildlife Trust is continuing to review the situation and updates will be posted on social media.

You can support Osprey Watch by donating via the link below. 

http://kielderospreys.wordpress.com/donate/

Between late March and early September Ospreys often hunt over the water. The birds use all parts of the reservoir, but some favourite areas are either side of the water at the dam, the area between Bull Crag and Leaplish Bay, and Leaplish Bay itself. The ospreys regularly hunt soon after first light and again in the early evening, around 17.30-18.00, but can be active at any time of the day. As the breeding season goes on, more fish will be required by ever-hungry growing chicks.

You can follow the progress of the Kielder ospreys by visiting the blog at, http://kielderospreys.wordpress.com.

 

Photo: Simon Mackie. Blagdon Lake. Somerset 31.3.13


What you said:

“Great to see the male and female together.” – Murray family, County Durham

“Fantastic to see such a rare sight!” – Lindsay Kemp, Isle of Wight

"Wonderful! Really excellent information.” – Margaret Clate, Newcastle

“Very knowledgeable guide. Great to see the ospreys. Thanks!!” – Dawn Livesey, Lancashire

Kielder Osprey Watch is possible thanks to the hard work of Kielder Water & Forest Park Development Trust, Forestry Commission, RSPB, Northumberland Wildlife Trust, Northumbrian Water and other partners. We would like to thank Bellingham Fund and Northumberland National Park Area Action Fund for their support this year which has funded volunteer support and leaflets to improve the visitor experience.

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